PLENARY SPEAKERS

Richard AmerRichard Amer

Director for Digital Government, Unisys Asia Pacific 

Richard Amer is the Director for Digital Government for Unisys in the Asia Pacific region.  Reporting to the global head of Unisys Public Sector, he is responsible for supporting the development and execution of global and regional solution strategies, with an emphasis on digital government, business transformation and application modernisation. 

Richard has more than twenty-five years’ experience working in both the private and public sector. Prior to joining Unisys, Richard worked in sales and consulting delivery roles for Oracle and Siebel where he worked closely with a number of government organisations in New Zealand. Prior to this he worked in leadership roles at the New Zealand Ministry of Social Development (MSD) and the Accident Compensation Corporation. At the MSD he was responsible for managing key customer and case management systems as well as playing a key role in the Ministry’s transformation programmes.     

Richard has extensive experience in the applications/system modernisation domain as well as deep architecture, design and delivery experience across a broad spectrum of solutions. 

Richard holds a Graduate Diploma Business Studies in Information Systems from Massey University. He lives in Whitby, Porirua in New Zealand with his wife and three children.

Enabling Better Public Services by New Ways of Sharing Data Securely

co-presented with Tim Green

Sometimes it takes a fresh approach and a willingness to embrace change to overcome a barrier. When the barrier involves the analysis of sensitive or restricted data, it’s even more important that the right people get access to the right data and insights. But is it still possible to produce actionable insights without seeing the data that is being analysed? 

Advancements in technology and innovative new solutions provide the ability for government agencies to expand the availability of high quality data while maintaining security and minimising disclosure risk. These innovative solutions include federated analytics whereby analysis can be performed by users on data held by two or more different organisations and the analytical results obtained without having access to the source data.

 

Professor John BlaxlandPROFESSOR JOHN BLAXLAND

International Security & Intelligence Studies, Director ANU

John Blaxland is a Professor in International Security and Intelligence Studies, Director ANU Southeast Asia Institute, and Head at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at ANU. He holds a PhD in War Studies from the Royal Military College of Canada, an MA in History from ANU, a BA (Hons) from UNSW and is a graduate of the Royal Thai Army Command and Staff College and the Royal Military Colllege, Duntroon (Blamey Scholar). He is a former Director Joint Intelligence Operations (J2), at Headquarters Joint Operations Command and was Australia’s Defence Attaché to Thailand and Burma/Myanmar.  He is a member of the ANU Academic Board as well as the Australian Army Journal editorial board and also an occasional commentator in the media.

His books include The Secret Cold War:The Official History of the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation 1975-1989 (Allen & Unwin 2016), East Timor Intervention (MUP, 2015), The Protest Years (A&U, 2015), The Australian Army From Whitlam to Howard (CUP, 2014), Strategic Cousins (MQUP, 2006), Revisiting Counterinsurgency (LWSC, 2006), Information era Manoeuvre (LWSC, 2002), Signals (RASigs, 1999) and Organising an Army (SDSC, 1989).

In 2014 he was awarded a Minerva Research Initiative grant for a project entitled "Thailand's Military, the USA and China: Understanding how the Thai Military Perceives The Great Powers and Implications For the US Rebalance". 

What’s Old is New?

The techniques of espionage and counter-espionage have evolved considerably since the days of the Cold War. But the emergence of the cyber threat has seen some of the methods of old coming back into vogue. Reflecting on current and future intelligence and security challenges an understanding of what’s gone before is increasingly important. This presentation draws on the wealth of material uncovered in the three-volume official history of ASDIO as seen through the eyes of one of its authors a former military intelligence officer with extensive experience across various parts of the intelligence community. 

 

Dr Brenton CooperDR BRENTON COOPER

Chief Technology Officer, Data to Decisions CRC

Dr Brenton Cooper is the CTO of the Data to Decisions Cooperative Research Centre, a collaboration between Government, Industry and Academia established to tackle the Big Data challenges of Defence and National Security. Brenton has previously held a variety of technology and management roles in BAE Systems, Tenix Defence and Motorola. He has led a variety of projects that demonstrate the value that can be extracted from large data holdings, with application to fraud detection, counter-terrorism, law enforcement and battle-space information management.

Data Analytics in Law Enforcement and Intelligence

The Data to Decisions Cooperative Research Centre (D2D CRC) has been established to champion the use of the data analytics in the Australian law enforcement and intelligence community.  In this presentation, we will review the challenges posed by subject matter experts from the national security community; understand the achievements to data within the D2D CRC and identify some of the future challenges.

 

R. Mark Evans OBER. MARK EVANS OBE

Deputy Chief Executive: Strategy, New Zealand Police

The Deputy Chief Executive: Strategy is responsible for ensuring Police has a clear and well understood strategic direction.

The Deputy Chief Executive: Strategy works across the organisation to support and ensure that the Executive Leadership Team delivers on its strategic priorities and has direct oversight of several key portfolios including: Ministerial Services, Policy, Research and Evaluation, Mobility, the Enterprise Portfolio Management Office, Strategic Integration and Performance and Insights.

Prior to commencing the DCE role in June 2014, he was previously Executive Director: Prevention and has been a member of the Police Executive since June 2011.

Mark came to New Zealand in 2007, having previously been the Director of Analytical Services for the Police Service of Northern Ireland. Mark earned an OBE for services to policing in 2006. He is a frequent contributor to international intelligence teaching and training and is a visiting Professor within the Department of Security and Crime Science at University College London.

Reflections on Intelligence

In this presentation Mark will share some of his observations and lessons about the value of intelligence, about its limitations and discuss some of the key events during his career that have shaped his understanding of what intelligence ‘success’ looks like. Drawing on his more recent responsibilities in shaping the strategic direction of the New Zealand Police, Mark will provide of an overview of the Prevention First National Operating Model and the role played by intelligence in informing day-to-day policing priorities. To stimulate further debate and discussion, Mark will provide some thoughts for intelligence professionals on ‘Future Policing’ - drawing particularly on the lessons from the New Zealand Police investment in mobile technology.

 

Tim GreenTim Green

Subject Matter Expert, Justice, Law Enforcement and Border Security, Unisys Asia Pacific

 Tim Green is the subject matter expert for intelligence analysis for the justice, law enforcement and border security domains for Unisys Asia Pacific.

Based in Canberra, he draws on a background that spans law enforcement, analytics and a broad ICT experience to understand the problems, challenges and processes that law enforcement and border security agencies operate within to help develop innovative and workable solutions.

Mr Green has more than a decade’s experience in law enforcement and border security as a senior intelligence analyst with the Anti-Corruption Commission in Perth, and an intelligence analyst for the Australian Customs Service.

Before joining Unisys, Mr Green held strategy and architect roles at a range of risk management and strategic intelligence consultancies and software providers including SAI Global, Encompass Corporation, Wynyard Group and Visual Analysis.

Mr Green holds a Graduate Diploma in Criminal Intelligence from Charles Sturt University in Australia.

Enabling Better Public Services by New Ways of Sharing Data Securely

co-presented with Richard Amer

Sometimes it takes a fresh approach and a willingness to embrace change to overcome a barrier. When the barrier involves the analysis of sensitive or restricted data, it’s even more important that the right people get access to the right data and insights. But is it still possible to produce actionable insights without seeing the data that is being analysed? 

Advancements in technology and innovative new solutions provide the ability for government agencies to expand the availability of high quality data while maintaining security and minimising disclosure risk. These innovative solutions include federated analytics whereby analysis can be performed by users on data held by two or more different organisations and the analytical results obtained without having access to the source data.

 

Anthony HelmondAnthony Helmond

Director, Intelligence, AUSTRAC

Anthony Helmond has worked at AUSTRAC for over 10 years in a variety of Intelligence and International technical assistance roles. In 2010 he was seconded to the AFP to support a major money laundering investigation. Recently Anthony has been the Director of the Tactical Intelligence section that oversees AUSTRAC’s provision of proactive tactical intelligence to domestic stakeholders as well as the exchange of financial intelligence with counterpart financial intelligence units around the globe.

Anthony was involved in the formation of the Fintel Alliance and is currently leading a project to increase AUSTRAC’s analytic capability and also driving the development of a new financial intelligence analysis course.

Fintel Alliance – A New Kind of Public Private Partnership

On 3 March 2017 AUSTRAC launched the Fintel Alliance - a world-first private-public partnership to combat money laundering and terrorism financing.

The Fintel Alliance involves industry and government collaboration that aims to transform the fight against terrorism financing and organised crime. It will also focus on developing ‘smarter regulation’, including streamlining the anti-money laundering and counter-terrorism financing (AML/CTF) regulatory framework for industry.

 

Grant NichollsDEPUTY COMMISSIONER GRANT NICHOLLS

Capability and Specialist Services Northern Territory Police Force

Mr Nicholls moved from his native New Zealand to oversee the Northern Territory Police, Fire and Emergency Services (NTPFES) Capability Audit in June 2016. He is currently the Deputy Commissioner for Capability and Specialist Services with the Northern Territory Police. 

Grant holds Masters Degrees in Public Policy and Administration, and Management, a Graduate Diploma in Emergency Services Management a Diploma in Business Studies and an Advanced Certificate in Terrorism Studies. 

He held the honorary rank of Colonel Commandant of the Corps of Royal New Zealand Military Police. 

Mr Nicholls has been the Acting Deputy Commissioner for District Operations in New Zealand with oversight of all twelve NZ Police Districts. He has also acted as the Deputy Commissioner for Resource Management, National Operations and Deputy Commissioner Operations. 

Mr Nicholls joined New Zealand Police in 1985 and held operational, policy and administrative posts including District Commander of Eastern District, based in Napier. He has led a number of serious crime investigations to successful conclusions. He is familiar with working in the Intelligence environment within Police and was introduced to the NM whilst on secondment to the UK. 

He also held the City and Rural Area Commander and CIB posts around the lower North Island, as well as Assistant Commissioner posts covering Strategy, Policy and Performance, and Specialist Operations. 

Mr Nicholls’ other experience includes a deployment to Thailand as a Contingent Commander after the 2004 tsunami, for which he was awarded a Special Services Medal. He has been on secondment with Strathclyde Police in Glasgow, served in Timor Leste and visited Police Services in Australia, Northern Ireland, the US and Canada. He also underwent command training at the Police Staff College, Bramshill, near London. 

Developing Intelligence Informed Policing in a 'Small' Jurisdiction

This presentation will draw on the experiences of other jurisdictions and share an approach to embedding the 3i model developed by Professor Jerry Ratcliffe. The model requires professional analysts to interpret the operating environment in order to influence decision makers to impact the operating environment. How could this be achieved in a policing environment comprising 1400 sworn staff spread over an expansive geographic area? Technology, infrastructure development and process change will feature as the Northern Territory Police take steps along the journey which is a “work in progress”. 

 

Neil PatersonAssistant Commissioner Neil Paterson APM

Victoria Police, Intelligence and Covert Support Command 

Neil has had a diverse career with Victoria Police spanning almost thirty years where he has gained broad operational policing skills, identifying early on in his career that he enjoyed undertaking complex investigations.

Transferring to the Homicide Squad in 1988, Neil was the lead investigator in a number of complex homicide investigations which relied upon surveillance devices and telephone intercepts to gather evidence.

In 2003 Neil was promoted to Detective Sergeant at the Arson Squad and subsequently to Senior Sergeant at the Commonwealth Games Planning Office in 2004. In this role Neil had responsibility for security planning for the Athlete’s Village and also took on operational responsibility during the 2006 Commonwealth Games.

In 2010 he commenced as the Detective Superintendent at the State Intelligence Division (SID).  During this time Neil oversaw a successful bid to Government to fund the Sex Offender Registry, delivered enhanced capability through the development of the Security & Organised Crime Intelligence Unit, created the Sporting Integrity Intelligence and the Prisons Intelligence Unit’s and delivered the new Victoria Police Intelligence Doctrine.

After 3 years at SID Neil became the Divisional Commander of the Frankston Division encompassing the Frankston and Mornington Peninsula Councils. He reformed their tasking & coordination model and built a joint-agency case management system.  For the financial year 2014/15, Neil delivered the largest decrease in total crime of any Division in the State.

In July 2015 Neil commenced as the Chief of Staff to new Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton before taking promotion to his current role in November 2015.

Neil currently holds a Juris Doctor (Master of Laws), a Graduate Certificate in Applied Management, a Graduate Diploma in Disaster Management and a Diploma in Frontline Management.

The Need to Share

This presentation will address each of the three components of the conference theme of ‘Breaking Down the Barriers’. The presentation will look at the key enablers to enhance the need to share – effective and robust internal engagement; using technology to facilitate greater sharing and learning plus considering how you think about and manage predictive intelligence.

 

Dominique PoidevinDOMINIQUE POIDEVIN

Assistant Secretary Intelligence Support to Operations, Department of Immigration and Border Protection

Dominique is the Assistant Secretary Intelligence Support to Operations in the Department of Immigration and Border Protection (DIBP), responsible for overseeing the delivery of direct intelligence support to border operations, and forming part of the leadership group driving the transformation of the border intelligence function.

Prior to joining DIBP in 2015, Dominique spent over ten years in the Defence Intelligence Organisation (DIO) in a variety of analytical, liaison and corporate roles, including an analytical branch head role; leading the organisation’s Capability Support branch, overseeing tradecraft and training, intelligence production, psychological services, and service delivery relationships; and Chief of Staff to Director DIO.

Dominique also spent two years as an integrated analyst in the US Defense Intelligence Agency, and deployed as a civilian to Timor Leste in support of Op ASTUTE, Australia’s stabilisation operation in Timor Leste.

Dominique has a Bachelor of Economics from the University of Queensland.

Breaking Down Intelligence Barriers Across Operations, Investigations and National Security: the Border Intelligence Experience

 

 

tag line dates 2017