SESSIONAL Speakers

Edward Barker

Founder & CEO, Crown Vetting

Edward Barker is the founder and CEO of Crown Vetting, a national security vetting agency. He is also the founder of Cleard.life, an intelligence and defence industry-focused consulting organisation that delivers background suitability assessments. Edward has an undergraduate degree in Business and a Master’s Degree in Communication and Leadership. He lives on the Sunshine Coast with his wife and two children.

Breaking Down Barriers Through Proactive Vetting Management

There is significant pressure on government security vetting agencies to clear a growing backlog of Top Secret Positive Vetting (TSPV) clearances. This barrier is getting higher and is now calculated not in months, but years. A collaborative inter-agency approach should be considered in order to break down these barriers and get the right insights flowing to the right people at the right time. 

 

Professor Boualem BenatallahProfessor Boualem Benatallah

Scientia Professor, School of Computer Science and Engineering, UNSW Sydney
Leader, Data Curation Research Stream, Data 2 Decisions CRC

Professor Benatallah is a Scientia Professor and Research Group Leader at the School of Computer Science (CSE), University of New South Wales (UNSW, Sydney, Australia). His research interests are developing fundamental techniques in service composition, data curation, end user analytics, quality control in crowd sourcing systems, and business processes management.

He has published more than 230 refereed papers including 70 journal papers. His work is highly cited, including seminal in the field of services composition. He is member of the editorial board of numerous international journals including ACM Transactions on Web and IEEE transactions on Cloud Computing. He was a visiting Professor at a number of international universities. As the chair of the CSE research committee, he was member of the team (comprising multiple university, government and industry partners) that constructed the successful bid for the new Smart Services CRC (Cooperative Research Centre) which was awarded $30m in federal funding in 2007. He is a leader of the data curation research stream at the Data to Decisions CRC.

Cognitive Computing for Intelligence and Law Enforcement

This session will describe a research-led innovation project being conducted by the Data2Decisions Collaborative Research Centre (D2D) called ‘Integrated Law Enforcement’ (ILE). The goal of ILE project is to leverage advances in information technology to help investigators efficiently collate, assess, task, make decisions and present information to achieve investigative aims. The concepts, architectures and technologies being applied within the ILE are designed to set a pathway for cognitive computing becoming the primary case management technique for criminal investigations and intelligence.

 

Babette BenoussanBabette Bensoussan
The Decision Making Maverick, The MindShifts Group

Babette Bensoussan is an internationally esteemed leader in the field of Competitive Intelligence (CI) and Strategy. Her credentials are built upon a long-standing series of outstanding achievements, both business and academic. She is Australia’s only awarded CI professional and is one of the most published business authors. 

In 1992 Babette founded the MindShifts Group, a leading consulting company specialising in Competitive Intelligence and Strategy. As company director Babette has led the MindShifts Group through over 300 projects with Australian and Fortune 500 companies. Her skills and expertise have been successfully applied to a huge range of industries, and her clients have included (but are not limited to) aerospace, information technology, pharmaceutical, manufacturing, and financial services companies. In 2006 Babette was the recipient of the SCIP Meritorious Award, the world’s most prestigious award in the field of Competitive Intelligence. She was the first international and only Australian recipient of this prize.

In addition to providing her talent and experience to her clients, Babette has co-authored five critically acclaimed and popular books on Competitive Intelligence and Strategy. Two of her titles, Analysis Without Paralysis and Business and Competitive Analysis, remain the world’s number one and two best selling titles on Competitive Intelligence. She also has extensive academic credentials, and has held teaching positions at many of Australia’s leading universities and business schools. She is currently an Adjunct Professor in the School of Business at the University of Technology, Sydney.

Babette’s talent, experience and dedication to teaching and communicating have resulted in her coaching and mentoring sessions proving to be an invaluable source of support and inspiration to leaders, employees and anyone with a keen interest in business strategy. 

Decision Making, Analysis and Intelligence 

In today’s complex and rapidly changing environment, it is imperative that executives understand their competitive environment to make better informed decisions on how market changes will impact their businesses and opportunities for growth. Without clear insights, the quality of decision making decreases and we can see this in so many areas in both government and business. While collecting information is now easier than ever, business insights to address key decisions can only come from good analysis. So how does one do good analysis? This presentation will briefly address the wealth of analytical tools available for better intelligence delivery.

 

Aleksandra BielskaAleksandra Bielska 
Consultant, i-intelligence GmbH

Aleksandra Bielska is an educator, researcher and consultant specialising in intelligence and its related disciplines. As an educator, she has taught intelligence theory and practice to public and private sector organisations, including at the NATO School in Oberammergau, Germany, NATO’s Centre of Excellence - Defence Against Terrorism (COE-DAT) in Ankara, Turkey, and the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), Switzerland.

As a researcher, Aleksandra has worked on a number of EU-funded projects dedicated to improving the research and analytic capabilities of European security and law enforcement professionals. She is currently working on the FP7-funded VALCRI (Visual Analytics for Sense-making in Criminal Intelligence Analysis) project which aims to develop state-of-the-art technologies and advanced training curricula for criminal intelligence analysts.

Finally, as a consultant, Aleksandra has worked on numerous client assignments in Europe and the US. Her advisory work covers such fields as competitive intelligence, cyber intelligence, risk management, and knowledge management. Aleksandra holds an M.A. in Intelligence and International Security from King’s College London, and a B.A. in Intelligence Studies from the Mercyhurst University’s Department of Intelligence Studies in Erie, PA, in the United States. She is also a Chair of the Polish chapter of the Society of Strategic and Competitive Intelligence Professionals (SCIP) and a member of the board of the European chapter of International Association For Intelligence Education (IAFIE).

The Intelligence Analyst as Internal Consultant

co-presented with Chris Pallaris

Analysts are typically employed to address challenges external to the organisation. However, their ability to do so is often hampered by challenges within the organisation they serve. Such challenges include limited planning, poor information management, siloed working, and a failure to implement proper policies and workflows, whether within or between departments. We argue that many of these challenges can be addressed by extending the role of the analytic function to include internal consultancy. Analysts operating as internal consultants would use an extended “playbook” of analytic techniques to help their organisation innovate, collaborate, boost performance and manage change. Internal consultants would also work with their colleagues to foster the skills and disciplines needed by a 21st century workforce grappling with ever-more complex data flows and operating environments.

Extending the analyst’s responsibilities may seem counter-intuitive. We argue, however, that doing so merely redeploys cognitive horsepower to achieve the same ends - greater security, comparative advantage and organisational learning. The paper will elaborate on the benefits of developing such a capability, and provide guidance on how to do so. It will also demonstrate how internal consulting can be blended with intelligence analysis to make the latter more effective. The research presented in this paper borrows from our experience as advisors to security and intelligence organisations, and from research completed under the auspices of the EU-funded VALCRI project. VALCRI (www.valcri.org) is a four-year initiative dedicated to improving the criminal intelligence capabilities of EU member states using a blend of technical and non-technical solutions. 

 

Guy BorneGuy Bourne

Consultant, Public Security and Financial Crime, SAS Australia and New Zealand

Guy is a domain specialist for analytics within public security and financial crime at SAS Institute. Throughout university he actively avoided applied mathematics, preferring the puzzles of abstract algebra and graph theory. As it turns out, these areas of mathematics are applied heavily in fraud, security and intelligence.

Beginning his career in London, looking at financial crime and misconduct within the banking sector, he was always looking for ways to apply known algorithms in new areas. What is the shape of credit card fraud? Can we break it apart? How can we visualise it? Now, working in Australia and focusing on ‘crime in context’ the questions keep coming. What can survival Analysis tell us about recidivism? Is bad behaviour infectious (in a way that we can monitor)? What does a change in network structure mean in the context of organised crime? The questions aren’t always easy, and sometimes, there isn’t a ‘correct’ answer; but what’s important is to keep asking questions.

Institutional Memory

Garbage in, garbage out. It holds true in most contexts. Didn’t train for that marathon… you’re going to have a hard time. Didn’t study for an upcoming exam, you won’t enjoy it.

It is perhaps most true in the field of Machine Learning. Just because your data isn’t perfect doesn’t mean that you can’t derive value from it. Bringing data together from inside and outside an organisation creates an holistic view or Persons, Objects, Locations, and Events. Intelligence agencies can then start to leverage their institutional memory, increasing efficiencies and accuracy across the board to help better protect the public they are sworn to serve.

It’s true that it’s not just what you know that counts, in the context of Intelligence, it’s what WE know.

 

Ross BuglakRoss Buglak

Senior Solution Architect – Big Data Analytics, Data to Decisions CRC

Ross is an experienced Solutions Architect and Software Developer, who has held a range of senior technical positions across the Commercial and Defence sectors. Ross has expert skills in Software and Systems Architectures, Software Development, Big Data, Machine Learning, Image and Natural Language Processing. He recently led multi-disciplinary engineering and research teams, delivering solutions in big data analytics, large scale object detection in images and extracting knowledge from text. Currently he is applying and expanding his skills in the role of Senior Solutions Architect at Data to Decisions CRC.

Innovative Process for Detecting Early Stages of Radicalisation

Detecting early stages of radicalisation is a complicated process of finding, corroborating and processing data from various sources, including the Internet. Social media has become an important source of data for intelligence activities as various social media platforms are used by extremists for propaganda and radicalisation of large numbers of individuals across the globe.

There are significant technical and organisational challenges that law enforcement and other government agencies face in combating the spread or terrorist propaganda and radicalisation online, including:

  • Massive volumes of data, but at the same time sparsity of useful information
  • The dynamic nature of social media platforms
  • Lack of experts in radical Islamic propaganda
  • Foreign language barriers
  • Increasing volume of multimedia content (images and video)

We present a novel approach for addressing the above challenges that combines technical and non-technical elements and is a result of close collaboration of the D2D CRC and ANZCTC members. The approach combines D2D CRC’s expertise in Big Data, natural language processing, knowledge mining and multimedia understanding and the ANZCTC members’ expertise in radical Islamic propaganda and radicalisation. This approach enabled efficient development of a prototype online platform, known as APOSTLE, which is currently undergoing trials with ANZCTC participants.

 

Steve CurninSteve Curnin

Research Fellow, University of Tasmania

Steve is currently the Emergency and Crisis Management Advisor with a Tasmanian critical infrastructure organisation. He is also a post-doctoral Research Fellow in human factors at the University of Tasmania working with a Bushfire & Natural Hazards CRC project exploring strategic decision making in emergency management. He combines these roles as a member of the Resilience Expert Advisory Group of the Trusted Information Sharing Network for Critical Infrastructure that is managed by the Attorney General’s Department.

Steve has proven operational, policy and research experience in worldwide emergency and crisis management arrangements working for or with state and national government agencies, not for profit organisations, multinational corporations and the military. He is committed to developing and transferring best available evidence based practice to enhance disaster resilience.

Multi-agency Collaboration in Disasters: Building Trust Swiftly

This session will combine contemporary research and real-world practical examples to explore mechanisms that foster collaborative practice in time constrained and complex environments. Disasters invariably require the formation of temporary groups that often have no history of working together. In these situations, how do you span organisational boundaries and bridge the cultural nexus to ensure effective partnerships? How do you foster trusting relationships in a dynamic and uncertain environment to ensure pertinent intelligence can be shared to build a common operating picture? This presentation will use a human factors approach to understand how we can contribute to effective engagement between disparate groups.

 

Rebecca FealyRebecca Fealy 
Senior Director, Smarter Data Program, Australian Taxation Office

Rebecca is based in Canberra and currently leads teams responsible for the delivery of data and analytics support to the Tax Avoidance Taskforce – a 1000 strong workforce dedicated to dealing with transfer pricing, multinational structures, and the implementation of OECD’s Base Erosion and Profit Shifting measures. She also leads an area supporting the Serious Financial Crime Taskforce, which includes Offshore Tax Evasion and progressing global responses through the Joint International Taskforce for Shared Intelligence and Collaboration (JITSIC), under which she chairs the 12-country strong expert working group on data, analytics and intelligence.

Rebecca has been with the Tax Office for 17 years starting as an experienced data analyst practitioner and has led previous initiatives including the introduction of enterprise data warehousing, reporting, embedding analytics in automated treatment systems, the introduction of a data and analytics research and development laboratory, agile procurement mechanisms, and agile working values and practices.

Rebecca co-authored the Prime Minister and Cabinet commissioned report on Public Sector Data Management in 2015, and has contributed to Australia’s commitment to Open Government Partnerships and the recent Australian Productivity Commission Review into Data Access and Use. Rebecca’s key strengths are in whole systems thinking with people, processes, systems, and content. She has a particular bent toward technology and its application for data and analytics.

Insights from the Response to the Panama Papers Data Release
co-presented with Bruce Paynter

The Panama Papers is globally acknowledged as the largest ever “Leak” of data relating to potential tax avoidance and evasion schemes.  The International response to the leak was coordinated under Australian leadership and in order to deliver actionable insights many new and innovative approaches across people, process and technology domains had to be adopted. The session with Rebecca and Bruce will provide insights into the data itself, the approaches taken to respond to the leak, some of the findings from the analysis including risks that potentially extend beyond Tax issues and how work continues to ensure the response to the next leak will be more effectively managed.

 

Roberta JulianAssociate Professor Roberta Julian

Director, Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies, University of Tasmania

Associate Professor Roberta Julian (PhD) is the Foundation Director of the Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies (TILES) in the College of Arts, Law and Education at the University of Tasmania. TILES was established in 2002 through a formal partnership between the University of Tasmania and the Tasmanian Department of Police, Fire and Emergency Management (DPFEM). Institute staff engage in innovative, collaborative and interdisciplinary research.

Roberta is a sociologist with over 30 years of academic experience in teaching and research on social justice issues with a focus on migrant and refugee settlement, policing and criminology (including projects on law enforcement and public health, youth justice, family violence, and forensic science). She has been Chief Investigator on over 45 projects which have attracted over $3.3M in funding. Roberta is a member of the Steering Committee for the Institute for the Study of Social Change (ISC) at the University of Tasmania, a member of the Board of Studies of the Australian Institute of Police Management (AIPM), President of the Tasmanian Branch of the Australian and New Zealand Forensic Science Society (ANZFSS), Tasmanian representative of the Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers (AIPIO), and a past President of The Australian Sociological Association (TASA). 

Exploring Law Enforcement and Public Health as a Collective Impact Initiative: Lessons Learned from Tasmania as a Case Study

The law enforcement and public health (LEPH) movement is gaining worldwide traction. LEPH is an evidence-based multidisciplinary approach to service delivery that challenges the way law and health are currently administered, shifting from intersection to integration at the level of program design and upwards. This trend is particularly relevant to how we consider prevention, treatment and harm reduction interventions in many areas of policing and health.

Many of the problems that lie at the nexus of law enforcement and public health are exacerbated by social disadvantage. These ‘wicked problems’ require holistic approaches; addressing them is beyond the remit and capacity of law enforcement alone. ‘Collective Impact’ is an approach used to address complex and persistent social problems. It is model of service delivery that requires system-level mapping and analysis together with cross-sector engagement and coordination, steering away from isolated interventions of individual organizations.

The presentation will discuss the potential benefits as well as some of the practical barriers to the implementation of a collective impact initiative in LEPH in Tasmania. The discussion is based on a review of programs, agencies and initiatives that lie at the intersection of law enforcement and public health in Tasmania, drawing on (i) an analysis of the findings in evaluation reports, and (ii) the views of practitioners. We discuss the lessons learned from this Tasmanian case study and offer some suggestions with respect to identifying the preconditions for a collective impact model and how to build on these to initiate action. 

 

Suzanne LockhartSuzanne Lockhart

Managing Director, Technology Engineering Group Pty Ltd

Suzanne is a Criminologist and Criminal Justice professional with over twenty five years extensive public safety and security technology experience from an operational, theoretical and technical perspective. Suzanne has an operational background in State and Federal law enforcement, intelligence and counter-terrorism, and is a subject matter expert in biometric technology, identity crime, security innovation, criminal justice and privacy policy, community and public safety risk mitigation, and strategic consulting.

Suzanne has worked extensively across the public and private sectors both locally and internationally providing security technology and identity centric advisory services and consulting to organisations across; healthcare, education, aviation, maritime, financial services, immigration, border control, national security, national identity programs, justice, and corrections.

She has a Criminal Justice Admin degree and a Masters of Criminology degree by research in biometrics. Suzanne has undertaken specialist training in advanced CPTED methodologies, identity crime, criminal profiling, forensic facial image analysis, tactical risk assessment of people, passport and smart card document production and biometric technology.  Suzanne has published papers at an international level and been a presenter at many international conferences and workshops.

Biometric Technology Trends & Issues: Hardware, Software, Policy, Legal & Social Considerations

With an ever increasing range of uses and an increasing requirement for accurate and reliable identity mechanisms, the field of biometric technology is evolving rapidly. Software and hardware for biometric systems has advanced significantly in recent times, resulting in improved performance, accuracy, reliability and acceptance. However, as the technology becomes more widespread, the temptation to attempt to bypass, spoof, and obviate system protections by fraudulent means, will increase. System developers, information guardians and information owners must remain vigilant to these threats and undertake strict measures, both technical and procedural, to mitigate risks and consequences.

Research indicates that accurate and secure systems that are used fairly and with defined purpose are typically well adopted, nevertheless there is limited discussion regarding community understanding, perception and acceptance of biometric systems.

This presentation will discuss current trends in biometric hardware and software, and present issues from a legal, policy, administrative and social context, which should be considered prior to the implementation of any biometric system.

It is vital that decision makers remain cognisant of these trends and issues so that systems remain relevant, flexible, secure, adaptable and cost effective. Agency staff must equally remain up to date on such matters so that advances are incorporated into all facets of existing systems, as part of the general maintenance and development process, in order to promote wider acceptance and continued adoption of well-maintained biometric programmes.

 

Andrew MarshallAndrew Marshall

Analyst, EPA Victoria

Andrew Marshall is an analyst working for the Environment Protection Authority Victoria. In this role he analyses environmental data sets to identify threats and opportunities relating to environmental quality. He has worked for the organisation for more than eight years after completing degrees in statistics and atmospheric science.

Can You Attend the Site of a Pollution Incident Before it Happens?

Existing procedures determine how Environment Protection Authority Victoria (EPA) responds to pollution incidents. These responses are reactive, however the data captured in pollution reports can also guide proactive odour surveillance.

EPA has borrowed the “triple-T” strategy for policing: targeting, testing and tracking, and applied the strategy in an environmental pollution response setting with encouraging results.

 

Elaine OgdenElaine Ogden

Department of Industry, Innovation and Science portfolio, Commonwealth Public Service

In her current role Elaine is leading a program of projects to the create the National Measurement Institute's Strategic Roadmap 2030 in collaboration with the Executive.

Her usual role is Section Manager of Governance and Business Performance including the following functions: 

  • Program Governance & Projects including:
  • Trade Measurement Licensing, 
  • Trade Measurement Compliance & Enforcement, 
  • Stakeholder Engagement & MOU management
  • Communications & Media
  • Risk Management
  • Planning & Reporting

 

Grant OsborneGrant Osborne
Data2Decisions CRC

Grant is a System Architect at the Data to Decisions CRC in Adelaide – where he has been since 2015. He works in the Beat the News Engineering and DevOps team where he has designed and implemented a scalable ingestion and enrichment pipeline for analysis of social media data. He has experience building distributed systems using technologies such as Kafka, Hadoop, Parquet and Spark. The data pipelines he and his team have developed use natural language processing and automatic pattern recognition to extract predictive signals (including temporal and geographical components) from social media data. He works closely with D2D’s research partners and the Beat the News data science team to deliver enriched social media data to a PySpark and Jupyter based data science platform.

Grant is passionate about all things software engineering. He particularly enjoys systems that embrace simplicity, immutability, and functional principles.

Grant has completed two degrees at UniSA. Firstly, a Bachelor of Advanced Computing and Information Science in 2006, and then a PhD in 2011. His PhD was in the domain of Information Visualisation and Digital Forensics. This ignited an interest in data science and its application in law enforcement and defence, which is evident throughout his career.

The Beat the News System: Forecasting Social Disruption via Modelling of Online Behaviours

Beat the News is an automatic analytical system for forecasting and early detection of civil unrest events. This system has been providing continuous forecasts for the past 12 months, and has successfully detect events such as rallies, protests and strikes up to six weeks before they occur. The system is currently undergoing trials by multiple Australian law enforcement agencies and intelligence professionals.

We outline our scalable ingestion and enrichment pipeline mechanisms used to support the forecasting and modelling aspects of the system. We also describe how the Beat the News system uses cognitive computing techniques such as natural language processing and automatic pattern recognition to extract predictive signals from social media data.

We discuss the multiple models used to build forecasts and how we analyse and evaluate these against a record of ground truth data collected over the last two years. We use these evaluations to show how social media activity is predictive of real-world activities linked to civil unrest.

 

Chris PallarisChris Pallaris
Director, i-intelligence GmbH

Chris Pallaris is Director and Principal Consultant of i-intelligence, a commercial intelligence consultancy based in Zurich, Switzerland. i-intelligence works to improve the intelligence, foresight and risk management capabilities of public and private sector organisations around the globe.

Prior to launching i-intelligence, Chris served as Executive Editor of the International Relations and Security Network (ISN), where he led the development of the organisation's news and information services. He has also worked as a freelance journalist and as an analyst in the Disputes, Analysis and Investigations division of PriceWaterhouseCoopers (PwC).

In addition to his consulting work, holds several teaching positions including at Mercyhurst University's Department of Intelligence Studies, Vesalius College in Brussels, and the ZHAW's School of Management and Law. He is also a regular lecturer at the NATO School in Oberammergau, NATO’s Center of Excellence, Defence Against Terrorism in Ankara, Turkey, the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), and ETH Zurich.

Chris has a degree in International History from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and an MBA from the Open University. 

The Intelligence Analyst as Internal Consultant
co-presented with Aleksandra Bielska

Analysts are typically employed to address challenges external to the organisation. However, their ability to do so is often hampered by challenges within the organisation they serve. Such challenges include limited planning, poor information management, siloed working, and a failure to implement proper policies and workflows, whether within or between departments. We argue that many of these challenges can be addressed by extending the role of the analytic function to include internal consultancy. Analysts operating as internal consultants would use an extended “playbook” of analytic techniques to help their organisation innovate, collaborate, boost performance and manage change. Internal consultants would also work with their colleagues to foster the skills and disciplines needed by a 21st century workforce grappling with ever-more complex data flows and operating environments.

Extending the analyst’s responsibilities may seem counter-intuitive. We argue, however, that doing so merely redeploys cognitive horsepower to achieve the same ends - greater security, comparative advantage and organisational learning. The paper will elaborate on the benefits of developing such a capability, and provide guidance on how to do so. It will also demonstrate how internal consulting can be blended with intelligence analysis to make the latter more effective. The research presented in this paper borrows from our experience as advisors to security and intelligence organisations, and from research completed under the auspices of the EU-funded VALCRI project. VALCRI (www.valcri.org) is a four-year initiative dedicated to improving the criminal intelligence capabilities of EU member states using a blend of technical and non-technical solutions. 

 

Bruce PaynterBruce Paynter 
Director, Smarter Data Program, Australian Taxation Office

Bruce is based in Brisbane and currently leads a multi-agency, multi-disciplinary team of Data Analysts, Data Scientists and Intelligence Analysts who provide ongoing support to the Off-Shore Tax Evasion risk stream of the Australian Taxation Office, the Serious Financial Crime Task Force and internationally with the Joint International Taskforce on Shared Intelligence and Collaboration (JITSIC). Since May 2016 the team has worked, amongst others, the Panama Papers data sets at both domestic and international levels.

Bruce joined the Australian Taxation Office in September 2000, prior to which he served in the Australian Customs Service and the Regular Army. During his career he has worked as a Criminal Intelligence Analyst, an Investigator and an IT Project Manager delivering Intelligence Technology systems. Bruce holds a Degree in Justice Administration (Criminology) from Griffith University and Post Graduate qualifications in Fraud Investigation from Charles Sturt University.

Insights from the Response to the Panama Papers Data Release
co-presented with Rebecca Fealy

The Panama Papers is globally acknowledged as the largest ever “Leak” of data relating to potential tax avoidance and evasion schemes.  The International response to the leak was coordinated under Australian leadership and in order to deliver actionable insights many new and innovative approaches across people, process and technology domains had to be adopted. The session with Rebecca and Bruce will provide insights into the data itself, the approaches taken to respond to the leak, some of the findings from the analysis including risks that potentially extend beyond Tax issues and how work continues to ensure the response to the next leak will be more effectively managed.

 

Dr Nadeem QaziDr Nadeem Qazi

Research Fellow, Project VALCRI FP7-IP-608142, Middlesex University, London, UK

Dr.Nadeem Qazi is Research Fellow at Interaction Design Centre, Middlesex University London. He has earned a Ph.D. degree in Engineering (Artificial Neural Network) from Cranfield University UK. He also has served as post-doctoral research fellow in National Centre of Geo-Computation at National University of Ireland and Intelligent System Research Centre at University of Ulster. He has contributed research in EU based projects including Total Energy Management for Production Operations (TEMPO), a collaborative research project between the University of Ulster (UK), Limerick Institute of Technology (Ireland), International Energy Research Centre (Ireland) and the National Energy Competence Centre (Ireland). Presently he is engaged on VALCRI FP7 research project at Middlesex University London, led by Professor William Wong.

Dr.Qazi has more than 10 years of IT experience in software engineering, real time process monitoring and intelligent data mining. His research interest lies in machine learning, Text mining, Visual Analytics, Big data mining, Internet of things, and data visualisation.

VALCRI: Facilitating Human Reasoning and Analytic Discourse in Criminal Intelligence Analysis

co-presented with Professor William Wong

In this talk we introduce the concepts of analytic reasoning, analytic discourse, and sense-making in the context of intelligence analysis where data is often ambiguous, uncertain, deceptive, and fraught with missing or out of sequence data. We also discuss the demands that such systems place on the police analyst and the thinking and reasoning strategies they bring to bear on the problem of intelligence and investigative analysis. We then introduce  VALCRI (FP7-IP-608142) - an European Commission funded project to research and develop a radically different crime fighting capability: Visual Analytics for sense-making in Criminal Intelligence Analysis. The aim of the design of this new system is to enable insight, encourage imagination, ensure transparency, and engage with fluid and rigorous interactions; harnessing the power of human expert intuition to be creative and speculative, while enabling the rapid transition to test these early and tentative explanations and hypotheses with scientific and empirically based methods.

 

John SchmidtJohn Schmidt
Founder/Synthesist, CANSYNTH

John M Schmidt is the founder of CANSYNTH, and practices the discipline of synthesis, consulting, teach and speaking on subjects in areas including synthesis, foresight, strategic intelligence, risk, strategic planning, organisational development, and counter-terrorist resourcing.

John retired in June 2015 from FINTRAC (Canada’s Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU)), where he had been since 2000, first as Manager, Planning, then as part of a small strategic intelligence team.

Between 2006 and 2011, John was seconded to Canada’s Integrated Threat (now Terrorism) Assessment Centre (ITAC), where he produced a major study and model of terrorist resourcing.

Returning to FINTRAC, John became Team Leader, Strategic Research and Analysis. In 2014, John joined FINTRAC’s compliance sector as Team Leader, Intelligence Integration and Dissemination.

Before joining FINTRAC, John worked for the Alberta Attorney General’s Department, 1977-1988, University of Canberra, 1988-1989, Australian Attorney-General’s Department, 1989-2000, and AUSTRAC (Australia’s FIU), 2000.

John has BSc and MSc degrees in Psychology from the University of Alberta. 

The Real Australian Intelligence Community

The mindset and formal framework that isolates the six agencies of “the Australian Intelligence Community” as such from the wider community of departments and agencies involved in intelligence production is outdated and ultimately self-defeating. It has produced interaction, communication and integration gaps that have negatively affected Australia’s intelligence outcomes. We need to rethink the nature and formal composition of the Australian IC in the broader sense.

John proposes a framework for a single Australian IC with definitionally discrete, but highly interactive groupings of agencies and departmental units, each grouping being distinguished by the extent of agencies’ intelligence focus.

 

Dr Charles VandepeerDr Charles Vanderpeer

Lecturer, Intelligence & Security, Charles Sturt University

Dr Charles Vandepeer is a senior lecturer in Intelligence and Security Studies at Charles Sturt University. His career has included service in the Royal Australian Air Force and as a civilian Defence Operations Research scientist. Charles completed his PhD at the University of Adelaide examining intelligence analysis and threat assessmentwithin Australia, the United States and United Kingdom. He has been involved inlecturing and course development at the undergraduate and post-graduate levelas well as teaching applied thinking skills in the private, public and not-for-profit sectors. Charles completed his undergraduate degree at the University of the South Pacific (Fiji), where he gained first-hand experience in understanding the power and influence that cultures, mindsets and perspectives can have on how we interpret and interact with the world around us.

As a Squadron Leader, Charles served as the senior Air Force lead for Australian and Coalition analytic teams on deployment, gaining operational experience in the Middle East. Charles has spoken and published nationally and internationally on intelligence analysis, operations research, critical thinking and decision-making. He is the author of the book Applied Thinking for Intelligence Analysis and is in the final stages of his next book Asking Good Questions.

Intelligence and Technology: Who's Asking The Questions?

Modern intelligence has always been associated with cutting-edge technologies. Whether big data, supercomputers, encryption, or satellites, technology has been seen as offering advantages for intelligence agencies and organisations over competitors and adversaries. What is often overlooked is that it is usually a combination of lots of technologies, systems and people where advantages are gained. This presentation considers some key questions that leaders, operators and analysts need to be asking about intelligence and technology in order to grasp opportunities and avoid risks.

 

Kirsten WilliamsKirsten Williams

Executive Advisor, Office of the Assistant Commissioner, Intelligence and Covert Support Command, Victoria Police

Kirsten commenced employment as a Policy Advisor with Department of Justice in 2002. Having always wanted to pursue a career in criminal intelligence, Kirsten joined Victoria Police in 2005 as a civilian intelligence practitioner and has performed analytical roles in a range of operational and strategic intelligence areas. In 2008, Kirsten assumed the role of Intelligence Manager and developed the inaugural Road Safety Intelligence Unit. In 2010, Kirsten developed and managed Victoria Police’s State Tasking and Coordination Model. More recently, Kirsten has been a Senior Specialist Analyst responsible for providing strategic advice on intelligence and state-wide assessments. In 2015, Kirsten was appointed the Executive Advisor to the Assistant Commissioner, Intelligence and Covert Support Command.

Kirsten holds undergraduate degrees in Psychology and Criminology, post graduate qualifications in Criminology (The University of Melbourne), Criminal Intelligence (Charles Sturt University) and Management (Victoria University).

Joining the Australian Institute of Professional Intelligence Officers (AIPIO) in 2004, Kirsten has undertaken various roles on the AIPIO board including State Representative, Regional Representatives Manager and Strategy and Planning Coordinator. Kirsten is passionate about professionalising intelligence and developing emerging leaders in all practices. This has led to Kirsten taking on her current role as Deputy Chair of the Alpine Valleys Community Leadership Program.

Panel Facilitator: Breaking Down the Barriers – Implications of the Implementation of Home Security / Home Office on the Intelligence Community in Australia

 

Professor William WongProfessor B.L. William Wong
VALCRI – Visual Analytics for Sense-Making in Criminal Intelligence Analysis (FP7-IP-608142), Middlesex University London

Professor B.L. William Wong PhD FNZCS FBCS is professor of Human Computer Interaction and head of the Interaction Design Centre. His research interest is in the area of cognitive systems engineering, and the representation design of user interfaces and visual forms that enhance information uptake and facilitate sense-making, situation awareness, reasoning, and decision making  in real-time dynamic environments.  

He is also the inventor of INVISQUE. His research has included work domains such as air traffic control, hydro-electricity dispatch control, emergency ambulance command and control, and intelligence analysis. He is recipient of over US$25.3 million in grants, and is or has been Project Coordinator for several US-UK and European Union multi-institution R&D project consortiums, such as FP7 VALCRI (Visual Analytics for sense-making in Criminal Intelligence Analysis), a 17-partner IP, and other projects funded by the UK and US Governments. Together with his students and colleagues, he has published over 100 scientific peer reviewed articles.

VALCRI: Facilitating Human Reasoning and Analytic Discourse in Criminal Intelligence Analysis

co-presented with Dr Nadeem Qazi

In this talk we introduce the concepts of analytic reasoning, analytic discourse, and sense-making in the context of intelligence analysis where data is often ambiguous, uncertain, deceptive, and fraught with missing or out of sequence data. We also discuss the demands that such systems place on the police analyst and the thinking and reasoning strategies they bring to bear on the problem of intelligence and investigative analysis. We then introduce  VALCRI (FP7-IP-608142) - an European Commission funded project to research and develop a radically different crime fighting capability: Visual Analytics for sense-making in Criminal Intelligence Analysis. The aim of the design of this new system is to enable insight, encourage imagination, ensure transparency, and engage with fluid and rigorous interactions; harnessing the power of human expert intuition to be creative and speculative, while enabling the rapid transition to test these early and tentative explanations and hypotheses with scientific and empirically based methods. 

 

Stephen ZidekStephen Zidek 
Adjunct Professor, Mercyhurst University – Erie, PA, USA

S.C. Zidek currently serves as an Adjunct Professor for the Applied Intelligence Graduate Program at Mercyhurst University, located in Pennsylvania, USA. Previously, Zidek served as an Assistant Professor there, teaching several intelligence courses for both undergraduate and graduate programs: intelligence methods and analysis, financial intelligence analysis, intelligence communications, leadership and strategic intelligence.  Moreover, he has recently supported the U.S. Department of State as a strategic and financial intelligence instructor preparing and delivering training and educational material for workshops on counterterrorism financing (CTF) and intelligence analysis to senior government personnel in Asia and the Balkans. 

Prior to joining Mercyhurst University, he co-founded a cyber intelligence and strategic business company after serving as the Vice President and Director of the Anti-Piracy Intelligence Center at the Motion Picture Association in Los Angeles. Before entering into the private sector, Mr. Zidek worked as an Intelligence Officer for the U.S. Government in a number of analytical and policy positions in the US government. Mr. Zidek also has served in the United States Marine Corps (active and reserves) in numerous operational and intelligence units, reaching the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, and deploying to the Middle East during the Persian Gulf War (1990-1991) and during Operation Iraqi Freedom (2004).

Improving Engagement Practices of your Millennial Intelligence Workforce By Effective Mentoring & Analytical Tradecraft Development

Plato reportedly wrote that human behaviour flows from three sources: desire, emotions and knowledge. Regardless of the quote’s attribution, one needs to understand what makes its peoples’ tick in order to leverage effectively the expertise and motivation of your workforce. As more Millennials, or Generation Y’ers, increasingly constitute larger percentages of the intelligence workforce in both public and private sectors, it is important not only to understand their desires, emotions, and knowledge, but also their perspectives, expectations, and career objectives.

Psychologists and sociologists alike have identified some less than “flattering” behavioural and attitudinal attributes about Millennials that earlier generations (Generation X’ers and the Baby Boomers) find difficult to reconcile. However, Millennials possess a number of admirable traits too.  Understanding the positive as well as the more challenging aspects of their behaviour will allow intelligence organisations to better recruit and retain qualified Millennials through improved mentoring and engagement practices while developing their analytic tradecraft and social and communication skills.  

 

tag line dates 2017